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During October 2002, construction on the Terascale Simulation Facility (TSF) focused on steel erection of the office section, pouring concrete on the computer floor, and backfilling with dirt in the mechanical rooms to allowing the installation of electrical conduit. The month of October concluded with the "topping out" ceremony. *

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Concrete is poured on the west computer room floor
Concrete is poured on the west computer room floor.

Steel is erected on the east end of the office section
Steel is erected on the east end of the office section.

Concrete is finished inside the west end of the computer room
Concrete is finished inside the west end of the computer room. The large holes are for cold air for the computers. A raised floor will sit 4 feet above the concrete.

The west end of the mechanical and computer rooms (right) and the chiller room north of the computer section (left)
The west end of the mechanical and computer rooms (right) and the chiller room north of the computer section (left).
Steel erection begins on the third and fourth floors of the office section
Steel erection begins for the third and fourth floors of the office section.
The west computer room
The west computer room.
Dirt is packed in the underfloor area of the mechanical rooms, in preparation for installation of pipes and conduit
Dirt is packed in the underfloor area of the mechanical rooms in preparation for installation of pipes and conduit.
Rebar and steel decking for the east computer room floor, awaiting the pouring of concrete
Rebar and steel decking for the east computer room floor await the pouring of concrete.

A roof with a view ... looking east beyond the steel erection for the fourth floor office section.
Steel and decking is installed in the last part office section
Steel and decking is installed in the last part office section.
Steel beams for the office section being lifted into place
Steel beams for the office section being lifted into place.
The last vertical column for the third and fourth floors of the office section is raised into position
The last vertical column for the third and fourth floors of the office section is raised into position.
The last vertical column for the third and fourth floors of the office section is maneuvered into position
The last vertical column for the third and fourth floors of the office section is maneuvered into position.
The office section with floor decking in place
The office section with floor decking in place.
The TSF peeking above B451 in the view from across Inner Loop
The TSF peeking above B451 in the view from across Inner Loop.
The view from west of the site of the TSF computer room (left), the office section (center), and B451 (right)
The view from west of the site of the TSF computer room (left), the office section (center), and B451 (right).
The curved steel framing of the large conference room
The curved steel framing of the large conference room.
Members of the TSF Project team gathering to sign the last beam before it is hoisted into place
Members of the TSF Project team gathering to sign the last beam before it is hoisted into place. *
The last steel beam being hoisted into position on the office section
The last steel beam being hoisted into position on the office section. *
The last steel beam, with evergreen and flag, in place
The last steel beam, with evergreen and flag, in place atop the office section. *

 

* The "topping out" or "topping off" ceremony is a tradition that has been traced to around 2700 B.C. It has become a custom for ironworkers whenever the skeleton of a building or bridge is completed and the uppermost steel beam is being positioned. Before that final beam is hoisted, workers sign their names on the beam, and an evergreen tree and a flag are attached to the beam. Two ironworkers who are called "connectors" set the beam in its final position. There are various interpretations of the symbolic significance of the evergreen tree and the flag. Some say the evergreen signifies that the job incurred no worker injuries or loss of life; others suggest the evergreen signifies good luck for the future occupants. The flag is thought to be a patriotic symbol, perhaps as a protest in response to the "American Plan" launched in 1919 that promised the destruction of unions.